Author Archives: She Is Going Places

About She Is Going Places

Encouraging travelers of all ages, budgets, and backgrounds to get out and go exploring.

How to Feel Comfortable Going Out Alone

 

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Creative Commons photo / Georgie Pauwels

 

For a while, I’ve been thinking about how to write a helpful post about being okay with traveling alone, particularly in mind for women.

Now it’s time to do so.

Recently, a trending hashtag called #metoo has highlighted how many women have been sexually harassed and/or assaulted at some point in their lives. While sadly as these incidents occur in common settings, from the workplace to any public venue, travel can also involve scenarios in which women might find themselves in uncomfortable situations involving unwanted advances from catcalling to sadly the unthinkable.

While my tips or advice might sound more general, I would like to think that they can at least ease your worries or assumptions about what others might think of you being by yourself. Whether it’s venturing out where you live or in another destination, here are some ways to help you feel more comfortable with being out alone.

Don’t make nice if it doesn’t feel right

In particular with women, there’s a common feeling that people have to maintain politeness even in circumstances we’re we might feel unease. While I’ve met some people who hesitate in being assertive or showing or speaking what they think, it’s a good reminder to remember that you don’t have to explain yourself, or be nice, to those who make you uncomfortable. If something doesn’t feel right, don’t hesitant to leave or excuse yourself in doing so.

Go to afternoon showings

If you’re itching to see an exhibit, movie or play, but don’t want to feel awkward about being out at night, consider going in the afternoon. Matinee showings often attract different and smaller audiences where it’s easy to get into your seat and focus on what you came to see –and not worry about who’s noticing you.

Sit at the bar

Granted you might get hungry while being out, and heading into a crowded restaurant alone may make you want to loose your appetite. So do this: find a bar stool. Sitting in this part of a restaurant doesn’t mean you have to have an alcoholic drink; rather it helps make you not feel weird about being at a table. So order a meal with your beverage, and use this space to relax and maybe have some small talk with your bartender or those seated around you.

Go on a tour

One of the best ways for feeling not alone in a new location is by having a guide to go around with. Consider signing up for a visitor’s tour that gets you familiar with your location by having you walk around a certain area (and focusing on something that interests you). Once the tour is over, a good guide will ask if you need directions for what place you’re heading back to.

Read up on locations

While you would look up addresses of where you’re going, maybe delve a bit more about how to get around. Looking to use public transportation? Read up on everything from what type of tickets you need or if schedules can change (for example, New York City’s subway system can operate differently on weekends and holidays) on the day you plan to go. And if you’re driving, learn what you can do about parking; give yourself extra time in the case you might have to drive around to find a spot.

What tips would you offer to help women feel easier about traveling solo?

TWA Flight Center to Become a Hotel

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TWA Hotel Rendering (photo courtesy of MCR Development)

Do you remember TWA? Maybe you or someone you know has flown on this legendary airline. Either way, you’ll have the chance to connect with its legacy through its former terminal at JFK. Known as the TWA Flight Center, this landmark building is becoming a boutique hotel while also being restored to its grand splendor, set to finish construction in 2018.

This past week, I attended a media reception to announce design plans for this project. It was held at the One World Trade Center, which also ties into this news.

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Inside the TWA Flight Center / photo by Max Touhey

The event was held at the newly unveiled TWA lounge at 1WTC, a retro-themed sales office located on the 86th floor of the One World Trade Center.

A symbol of the Jet Age, the TWA Flight Center opened at Idlewild Airport – the original name for JFK Airport – in 1962. It was designed by architect Eero Saarinen, who is also noted for creations including the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the CBS (Black Rock) Building in New York City, and Dulles International Airport.

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Reception desk at TWA lounge at 1WTC / photo by Emily Gilbert

At the media reception, Tyler Morse, CEO of MCR Development, unveiled how this grand terminal for the former Trans World Airlines will become a 505-room hotel while also being reinstated to its original splendor.

“We’re bringing her back to life,” said Morse, whose New York-base hotel investment firm is responsible for this redevelopment project.

The year 1962 will also serve as the inspiration for the upcoming TWA Hotel, when all interior features of the original property will be restored to their heyday appearance such as its revered Ambassadors Club.

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The TWA lounge at 1WTC / photo by Jesse David Harris

An onsite museum will hold memorabilia relating to Trans World Airlines along with various objects connected to historic milestones in 1962.

The former terminal’s new structures housing the just over 500 rooms will actually be set back on either side of the terminal. Other additions include a 10,000-square-foot observation deck with runway views, six bars and eight restaurants, and 50,000-square-feet event space center. The hotel will be accessible via JFK’s AirTrain and the Saarinen passenger tubes connecting directly to JetBlue’s Terminal 5.

Closed to the public in 2001, and threatened with the possibility of demolition, the TWA Flight Center was designated as a NYC Landmark in 1994 and added to the National Register of Historical Places in 2005.

As for the TWA lounge at 1WTC, this sales center will have distance views of the 12-mile away JFK Airport, and look like as a timepiece with Saarinen’s noted white concrete and red chili pepper carpeting plus a front desk modeled after a TWA ticket counter. The location will be open to the general public by appointment only.

Coastal Splendors: Galveston Versus Corpus Christi

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Photo credit: Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau

 

Your Pick: Galveston or Corpus Christi?

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Photo credit: Visit Corpus Christi’s Facebook page

Along the Gulf Coast, the Texas cities of Galveston and Corpus Christi are blessed with natural wonders such as miles of beaches or a plethora of parks. And while man-made structures have come into the scene, they’re serving as an addition where visitors and locals can enjoy the sights and tastes of nature’s bounty.

Here’s where you can explore the coastal splendors of both Galveston and Corpus Christi.

Seawall Beach Expansion May 2017

Photo credit: Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau

Galveston’s Beaches and Parks

With beaches, Galveston’s got quite the range, with them being doubling as state parks. On the island’s west end, Galveston Island State Park puts you right near the Gulf of Mexico and Galveston Bay and also near wildlife. It’s coastal refuge for birds, so birdwatchers can put their binoculars to good use, and it also provides opportunities for taking in its waters and lands. Visitors can swim and fish in certain areas, and also hike or bike along four trails encompassing different habitats.

The 10-mile Seawall Urban Park provides a leisurely stretch along its boulevard, along with much beach, restaurants and tourist attractions including the amusement park, Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier.

Stewart Beach is quite family-friendly with amenities like restrooms and chair and umbrella rentals, while East Beach can draw a bit more of a livelier crowd.

Moody Garden Aquarium

Moody Gardens/Credit: Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau

Galveston’s Waterside Spots

Galveston’s got some major waterside spots too. Its best known attraction of this kind is Moody Gardens, a part-amusement park and part-leisure/wellness stay with various restaurants and an on-site hotel. Its latest addition is the Aquarium Pyramid, which holds exhibits such as a Jellyfish Gallery and habitats encompassing locations ranging from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, to the South Pacific and North Pacific.

Based on Pelican Island, Seawolf Park has a fishing pier, picnic spots and a playground, but is most noted for being the home of a World War II submarine, USS Cavalla and a destroyer escort called USS Stewart.

Then there’s the Texas Seaport Museum, where visitors can climb aboard ELISSA, a preserved 19th-century tall ship and see an adjacent museum and theater. Plus, Galveston contains a concentration of Victorian homes within its downtown area; they date from the mid to late 1800s. Must-see houses include the Ashton Villa, an Italianate villa that was the first mansion built in Galveston, and the prominent Bishop’s Palace, which reminds you of a castle due to its stained-glass windows, bronze sculptures and exquisite fireplaces.

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Corpus Christi’s Beaches

As for Corpus Christi, this city in the South Texas Gulf Coast is also plentiful in sand and surf. Let’s start with beaches. Along the Corpus Christi bay, McBee Beach gets all ages of beachgoers but is still picturesque with calm and clear waters.

Locals appear to flock to Whitecap Beach, noted for its white sands and one entrance to the Padre Island Seawall, a mile-long pathway serving bikes, joggers, and walkers. Then the Padre Island National Seashore is cited as the world’s longest, undeveloped barrier, with its residents being a multitude of bird species.

Named after the wild horses that once roamed here, Mustang Island is 18 miles of beautiful coastlines, beach area, and various fish and waterfowl. It’s also the neighbor of Mustang Island State Park.

 

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USS Lexington / Photo Credit: Visit Corpus Christi’s Facebook page

 

Corpus Christi – Waterside Attractions

Located just across Corpus Christi’s Harbor Bridge, North Beach has two top city attractions: the Texas State Aquarium and the USS Lexington, an aircraft carrier turned museum. North Beach also has a good variety of places to eat and drink and bayfront views, with the cities of Aransas Pass, Ingleside and Portland offering waterside opportunities like, fishing, boating, sailing, and kite surfing.

Corpus Christi’s Northwest side offers some of the best bird watching opportunities for bird lovers such as Hazel Bazemore Park, where each spring and fall people gather to watch thousands of hawks fly overhead. Labonte Park, at the city’s entrance, offers great views of the Nueces River as well as fishing and kayaking opportunities.

On Corpus Christi’s Southside, the South Texas Botanical Gardens and Nature Center provides some urban serenity with floral exhibits and gardens and trails that could lead to birds and butterflies. And downtown’s Marina Arts District co-mingles boat slips, restaurants, and artisans together.

So, which Texas city would you like to see first: Galveston or Corpus Christi? To get your trip planning started, choose from these Trip.com recommended lists of Galveston and Corpus Christi hotels.

This post is part of Trip.com’s Underdog Cities program.

2017 Travel Bloggers Summit on Study Abroad & Global Citizenship NYC

Official Travel Blogger Logo

I first heard about studying abroad during college when I went to interview the director of my school’s program for the student newspaper. While I don’t remember much of what we talked about, I do recall getting excited over the places as a student I could go to – Ireland, England, Spain, and Italy. And leaving with some flyers to peruse when I got home.

But I ended up not studying abroad. I never signed up.

Maybe I was hesitant, worried about the money aspect or missing out on what was happening with friends at home. Nonetheless, my travel years since college have made up for it. However, the opportunity could have taken me in directions I can only “what if” about.

Nowadays, studying abroad is becoming more the norm. It’s also getting help from travel experts and bloggers – with many having studied abroad themselves – in telling how transformative this experience can be. This Friday, I’m going to the Travel Bloggers Summit on Study Abroad & Global Citizenship at Hostelling International NYC to see how.

Presented by Hostelling International USA and Partners of the Americas, this three-day summit (which started today) is a sequel to an inaugural event at the White House in 2014. This initiative was established to encourage young people to set out and see the world through educational experiences. To help foster this push, many well-respected travel experts and bloggers were invited to Washington, D.C. to learn more and become involved in this project.

Many of them I will see tomorrow in NYC.

 

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Creative Commons photo/ Andreas Mortonus

 

 

Why Study Abroad?

So why promote studying abroad? Well, here’s some data. A 2016 Open Doors Report released by the Institute of International Education found that during the 2014-2015 academic year found that:

  • Reported 313,415 U.S. students studied aboard. As for where they went, Europe received the most U.S. students, with 170,879 of them participating in undergrad programs there. Outside of North America, the Middle East and North Africa hosted the lowest number of these students, with a combined total of 6,844.
  • What are they learning? The report found that these top five fields of study are attracting U.S. students to study abroad: STEM, business, social sciences, foreign language and international studies and fine arts. As for how long they’re gone, it’s short-term, with 63% of them going abroad for eight weeks.
  • As for who specifically is studying abroad, the report found that the largest ethnic group of U.S. students was white (at 72.9%). Students who identify as multi-racial, American Indian or Alaska Native are rarely doing so (at only a combined 4.6% for the 2014-15 academic year).

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Creative Commons photo / Kenneth Lu

 

Breaking Down Barriers

Another focus of this summit is to determine how to break down barriers that prevent students of diversity from studying abroad. A 2017 presentation on Diversity Abroad for a grant by Partners of the Americas found reasons such as:

  • Awareness of its value – misconception that it’s a vacation
  • Cultural restraints – since study abroad is not a traditional part of higher education experience, families are not likely to support the student either morally or financially
  • Finances – it’s too costly or students cannot afford the loss of income for the time period abroad

Even high education might also hinder opportunities for their students to study abroad due to issues such as map out courses for credits transfer and count toward graduation, lack of funding for new programs, and engaging with faculty and adminstrations to see the value of having a study abroad component.

What Can Be Done

Along with raising awareness, there are initiatives in making study abroad more accessible such as grants. Adminstered through Hostelling International USA, Explore the World scholarships help selected applicants in financing an international trip that includes an educational or service component.

Besides money, studying abroad is also noted for its non-tangible value: learning a new language, understanding of different cultures,and building skills that can serve an ever-global growing economy.

Another cool aspect of this NYC travel summit is that it’s happening during NYC’s Global Citizen Week, which will cumulate with Saturday’s Global Citizen Festival, a separate, ticketed event on Central Park’s Great Lawn. If you’re on Twitter, follow along with the discussion on Friday (Sept. 22) at 3 p.m. via the hashtag #studyabroadbecause.

Have you studied abroad? If so, share with me your experience.

 

 

 

 

Foodie Travel: What to Eat in Charlotte versus Raleigh

 

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Photo: Charlotte’s got a lot Facebook page

 

Your Pick: Charlotte or Raleigh?

 

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Photo: visitRaleigh Facebook page

 

While Durham has been getting buzz as a foodie destination, two other North Carolina cities also have much on their plates to offer – Charlotte and Raleigh. These Southern metropolises are spooning out different tastes and dining perspectives that will leave visitors satisfying. Perhaps even stuffed. From food to drink, here is a culinary comparison of the best of what Charlotte and Raleigh are serving up.

First, let’s start with Charlotte.

Charlotte’s Eateries

 

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Photo: The King’s Kitchen & Bakery / The Plaid Penguin

 

Nicknamed “The Queen City,” Charlotte has traditional Southern specialties but also cuisines representative of cultures from around the globe plus some fun infusions.

With an adjoining bakery and breakfast café, The King’s Kitchen & Bakery is a non-profit eatery that not only provides lunch and supper picks like gumbo, catfish and baked or fried chicken, and healthy fare, but also gives their workers a fresh start and helps to feed those within the local community. With locations in Charlotte’s Uptown and Southpark districts, Rooster’s Wood Fired-Kitchen puts a European twist on scratch cooking this cuisine.

In also what’s described as “Southern-leaning American fare,” 204 North Kitchen and Cocktails in Uptown gets a little spiffy but also has a drinks list featuring fun and unique pairings and classic mixed drinks. Or go for Lowcountry cooking at Mert’s Heart and Soul, a couple-owned, colorful and soul food eatery in Uptown Charlotte. Zada Jane’s in Charlotte’s Plaza-Midwood neighborhood gives vegetarians some love, with choices that could include their non-meaty “Kool Kips” nachos and a selection of salads and sandwiches (plus some options for carnivores).

 

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Photo: McKoy’s Smokehouse and Saloon Facebook page

 

Of course, Charlotte’s barbecue joints hold their own within North Carolina, tenderly. South Charlotte’s McKoy’s Smokehouse and Saloon offers smoked meats like their pecan-smoked wings and perfected seasoned pork. Since 1963, the no-frills Bill Spoon’s Barbecue in Starmount focuses on its food with cooking up Eastern North Carolina style barbecue (with the whole pig being prepared and served with a mustary and vinegary slaw). Then, there’s Midwood Smokehouse, with three locations throughout Charlotte, whose brisket got high rankings in The 100 Best Barbecue Restaurants in America.

Other interesting dining opportunities in Charlotte range from The Cowfish Sushi Burger Bar, an infusion minded eatery in South Park, to Aria Tuscan Grill bringing refined Italian fare to Center City, to Crepe Cellar Kitchen and Pub, a Euro gastropub noted for its savory crepes.

 

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Photo: The Old Mecklenburg Brewery Facebook page

 

Charlotte’s Breweries

As for the beer scene, Charlotte is also has raising the glass on breweries with some new or recent additions or long-time spots. Described as a Belgian brew pub, Heist Brewery in NoDa neighborhood is placed within an industrial setting with craft beers and pub fare.

There are German beer halls too. The Olde Mecklenburg Brewery has an eight-acre beer garden and pub, and VBGB Beer Hall and Garden puts a contemporary take on this tradition with 30 craft and import beers on top. Other noteworthy places include Birdsong Brewing Co., with lively scene serving flights, pints, and growlers; Sycamore Brewing, which also offers international eats, and the Growlers Pourhouse, with a curated beer program that rotates taps and prime bar food such as their award-winning Rueben sandwich. In NoDa, Free Range Brewing lets their

Other noteworthy places include Birdsong Brewing Co., with lively scene serving flights, pints, and growlers, and Sycamore Brewing, which also offers international eats. Growlers Pourhouse has a curated beer program that rotates taps and prime bar food such as their award-winning Rueben sandwich. Free Range Brewing lets their ingredidents determine what type of beer will be produced, in brewing small batch beers in various styles.

Now, let’s see what Raleigh has to offer food-minded travelers.

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Photo: Little City Brewing and Provisions Co. Facebook page

Raleigh’s Breweries and Distilleries

Raleigh’s more than 25 breweries are as diverse as their sudsy creations. In the Warehouse District of Downtown Raleigh, Crank Arm Brewing Company produces three flagship brews and rotates seasonal beer styles and works with local vendors and farmers in obtaining specialty ingredients for unique flavors. With a focus on creating a place for community, Oak & Dagger Public House serves up its draft beers and an “elevated pub” lunch and dinner menu. Another neat feature: a research library where experimental, small batch brews are being concocted. Then there’s Little City Brewing and  Provisions Co., described as an industry chic bar that not only serves beers but also unique cocktails and wines.

As for distilleries, Oak City Amaretto locally handcrafts this sweet Italian liqueur, and Raleigh Rum Company produces small batches of this distilled beverage. Plus, Pinetop Distillery – with its title coming from an old nickname for moonshine – offers tours of, and tastings at, their facility on Saturdays.

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Photo credit: Big Ed’s City Market Restaurant Facebook page

Raleigh’s Shops and Eateries

From Southern cooking to in North Carolina is essential. One popular place to go for breakfast or lunch in downtown Raleigh’s Moore Square District is Big Ed’s City Market Restaurant, noted for its funky ceiling fixtures and southern classics on the menu (there’s also a sister site called Big Ed’s North, located in North Raleigh). Big Ed’s also holds a Hot Cake challenge, consisting of eating a total of three large servings, and provides all-day breakfast offerings. Explore its location include the Historic City Market, with other tenants such as restaurants, cafes and bars. Best picks include Treat, an ice cream shop, and Woody’s At City Market, a long-time watering hole.

Trying BBQ is a must head to The Pit, a Warehouse District eatery serving a whole hog, pit-cooked barbecue, or Clyde Cooper’s BBQ, a Carolina-style barbecue fixture in downtown Raleigh since 1938, or fellow long-timer Dickey’s Barbecue Pit, which opened three years later!

 

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Photo: Escazu Artisan Chocolates Facebook page

 

Raleigh’s Chocolate Shops

Got a sweet tooth? In Raleigh, chocolate has quite a decadent place with a good amount of shops and factories. Azurelise Chocolate Truffles creates orders of this decadent treat and other sinfully good sweets, while Escazu Artisan Chocolates additionally prepares bars and other confections, and Videri Chocolate Factory holds tours of its facility.

So which city’s culinary scene has your mouth watering, or making you thirsty for more? To get your food-centered trip started, check out these suggested hotels in Charlotte and in Raleigh, respectively.

This post is part of Trip.com’s Underdog Cities program.

South Africa Tourism and Citi Bike NYC Host TriBeCa Block Party

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During the month of September 2017, Citi Bike NYC riders might want to check in at the TriBeCa docking station – at Franklin Street and West Broadway – to get a glimpse into South African art and culture.

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South African Tourism and Citi Bike officials with Imani Shanklin Roberts and Esther Mahlangu

On Wednesday, September 13, representatives from South African Tourism, South African Airways, and Citi Bike NYC held a ceremony unveiling of a street mural at this station. The event was to announce a month-long partnership between Citi Bike NYC and South African Tourism, to encourage New Yorkers to be inspired to see South Africa.

The mural was designed by New York City resident and visual art Imani Shanklin Roberts. At the Wednesday event, Shanklin Roberts said her Afrocentric piece was created in honor of Esther Mahlangu, a South African artist. Mahlangu, who was also at the ceremony, is recognized for her colorful and geometric paintings. In her comments, Shanklin Roberts noted that she had a piece of Mahlangu’s and was inspired by Mahlangu’s artistic methods.

The general public can join in the celebration this Saturday, September 16, with a South-African themed block party organized by Citi Bike and South African Tourism. Held in the vicinity of the Franklin Street and West Broadway docking station, this block party will run from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. It will feature South African food and music plus the opportunity to talk travel with ambassadors from South Africa.

Other aspects of this partnership involve 30 South African branded Citi Bike docking stations across the city and a special vacation package offer from South African Airways Vacations.

 

Dallas or San Antonio: Day and Nighttime Fun

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All Dallas photos via DallasCVB

Your Pick: Dallas or San Antonio?

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San Antonio photos via Visit San Antonio

While Dallas and San Antonio are both in Texas, each city has its respective offerings – day or night. In the northern part of the Long Star State, Dallas has been emerging as a major metropolis. As for its counterpart in between South and Central Texas, San Antonio is steeped in Colonial heritage; its roots trace back to its founding by the Spanish.

During the daytime or at night, here is a list of what both Dallas and San Antonio have for visitors to learn a thing or do or have some fun.

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Dallas Farmers Market is happening on weekends with its eateries and outdoor markets.

Daytime – Dallas

Within Dallas’ West End district, The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza takes visitors on a chronological journey not just about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy but also Kennedy’s life and legacy. After your visit, walk over to the plaza, to reflect upon the events taking place here in November 1963, and then to a nearby memorial to the President that’s a block away.

Dallas also has a link to another U.S. president. On the campus of Southern Methodist University, the George W. Bush Presidential Center, which houses a library and museum delving into the two terms held by this former Commander in Chief.

In East Dallas, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden puts you in a diverse and colorful habitat of flora and fauna extending to manicured lawns, sections showcasing species such as roses or camellias, and a trial garden area.

Within the Dallas Arts District, spend some time around Klyde Warren Park, an urban oasis that’s built over a six-lane freeway. Then head to the Dallas Museum of Art. Its collection spans over 5,000 years and across cultures ranging from Africa and Asia to the Americas. Afterwards, walk among the outdoor pieces of art at the Nasher Sculpture Center. If science is more your thing, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science has an IMAX theater and floors teaching about scientific discoveries across all fields with hands-on areas.

Of course, getting a morning or afternoon meal is important. Head to venues like the Dallas Farmers Market, with sit down or grab and go options with eateries serving up choices like seafood, Cajun, Mex-Tex or pizza.

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Deep Ellum has quite the music scene going on.

Nighttime – Dallas

Dallas neighborhoods are buzzing as an evening hangout spot; check out these particular two locations. From live music venues to breweries, Deep Ellum offers locations suiting your interest; perhaps go for a drink at Deep Ellum Brewing Company or Braindead Brewing. In South Dallas, the Bishop Arts District has a fair number of eateries and venues ranging from Bishop Cider Co – a hard cider producer with a tasting room at its location – to Tilman’s Roadhouse, a Western-chic restaurant serving comfort food.

For those unsure about what to eat, Trinity Groves is a trendy enclave that houses an eclectic mix of restaurants serving vegetarian, Middle Eastern fare, Chinese, barbecue, steak, or sushi. For overhead views of the city, the Reunion Tower takes you up over 500 feet and displays a layout of the city with its Halo interactive system.

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The Alamo is San Antonio’s iconic landmark.

Daytime – San Antonio

San Antonio has many daytime sightseeing options showcasing its history, day-to-day living, and culture. The Alamo may be well recognized for its popular tagline but this monument also offers visitors a history lesson through a tour of its battlefield and walks through its Alamo Church and Long Barrack Museum. Also spend time at the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park to learn more about Spanish frontier missions.

The San Antonio River Walk connects to sights including the San Antonio Museum of Art and Blue Star Contemporary, a nonprofit contemporary arts organization. It also now contains a new eight-mile expansion known as the Mission Reach, which directly links to the Spanish missions

San Antonio’s downtown area’s Main Plaza has the historic San Fernando Cathedral and hosts both seasonal and ongoing events like a Christmas tree lighting and a farmers’ market.

If nature is of interest to you, see the San Antonio Botanical Garden, with a beautiful range of plant wonders, or the Natural Bridge Caverns, a set of underground chambers that can be explored via lighted and paved routes. Or go for a slower pace at public parks like the new Phil Hardberger Park, a former dairy farm turned green space, or the kid-friendly Hemisfair with its noted Yanaguana Garden.

Museum aficionados can linger in the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, which puts on a consistent calendar of exhibitions and public events, or the Witte Museum, which bridges science, nature, and culture in one location.

For breakfast or lunch, go to The Guenther House, an art nouveau Southtown café at Pioneer Flour Mills that whips up pastries and various daily specials.

 

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The San Antonio River Walk has places to head out to for a great dinner.

Nighttime – San Antonio

San Antonio’s evening scene is all about nightclubs and dance halls. Do some toe stomping, or get some lessons in footwork, at Cowboys Dancehall. Unwind while hearing live music and enjoying refined Texas cuisine at Jazz, TX, or listen to some serious dueling piano action at Howl at the Moon. Sip on cocktails among rooftop views at Paramour or head to Zinc Bistro & Bar, a downtown favorite as a European wine pair with a Texas twist. Or hear some mariachi at The Mariachi Bar at Mi Terra Café.

The River Walk can also make for a nice nighttime option. Entertainment at The Majestic & Empire Theatres can feature musical acts and cultural performances. Best pick restaurants include Moses Rose’s Hideout, a watering hole with live music and a menu of burgers, tacos and barbecue; Waxy O’Connor’s, an authentic Irish pub; and Boudro’s, a New American bistro noted for its tableside made guacamole and grilled lunch and dinner offerings.

As for craft beer, find good choices. Freetail Brewing Co. produces staple suds such as their La Muerta made for the holiday, Dia de los Muertos. Ranger Creek Brewing & Distilling, an industrial “brewstillery” puts out a range of craft whiskeys and microbrews. Blue Star serves Southwestern fare in the happening Southtown neighborhood while Southerleigh Fine Food and Brewery operates within the city’s historic Pearl brewhouse.

Start your trip planning with these Trip.com recommended hotels in Dallas and San Antonio.

This post is part of Trip.com’s Underdog City campaign.