Monthly Archives: August 2017

Dallas or San Antonio: Day and Nighttime Fun


All Dallas photos via DallasCVB

Your Pick: Dallas or San Antonio?


San Antonio photos via Visit San Antonio

While Dallas and San Antonio are both in Texas, each city has its respective offerings – day or night. In the northern part of the Long Star State, Dallas has been emerging as a major metropolis. As for its counterpart in between South and Central Texas, San Antonio is steeped in Colonial heritage; its roots trace back to its founding by the Spanish.

During the daytime or at night, here is a list of what both Dallas and San Antonio have for visitors to learn a thing or do or have some fun.


Dallas Farmers Market is happening on weekends with its eateries and outdoor markets.

Daytime – Dallas

Within Dallas’ West End district, The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza takes visitors on a chronological journey not just about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy but also Kennedy’s life and legacy. After your visit, walk over to the plaza, to reflect upon the events taking place here in November 1963, and then to a nearby memorial to the President that’s a block away.

Dallas also has a link to another U.S. president. On the campus of Southern Methodist University, the George W. Bush Presidential Center, which houses a library and museum delving into the two terms held by this former Commander in Chief.

In East Dallas, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden puts you in a diverse and colorful habitat of flora and fauna extending to manicured lawns, sections showcasing species such as roses or camellias, and a trial garden area.

Within the Dallas Arts District, spend some time around Klyde Warren Park, an urban oasis that’s built over a six-lane freeway. Then head to the Dallas Museum of Art. Its collection spans over 5,000 years and across cultures ranging from Africa and Asia to the Americas. Afterwards, walk among the outdoor pieces of art at the Nasher Sculpture Center. If science is more your thing, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science has an IMAX theater and floors teaching about scientific discoveries across all fields with hands-on areas.

Of course, getting a morning or afternoon meal is important. Head to venues like the Dallas Farmers Market, with sit down or grab and go options with eateries serving up choices like seafood, Cajun, Mex-Tex or pizza.


Deep Ellum has quite the music scene going on.

Nighttime – Dallas

Dallas neighborhoods are buzzing as an evening hangout spot; check out these particular two locations. From live music venues to breweries, Deep Ellum offers locations suiting your interest; perhaps go for a drink at Deep Ellum Brewing Company or Braindead Brewing. In South Dallas, the Bishop Arts District has a fair number of eateries and venues ranging from Bishop Cider Co – a hard cider producer with a tasting room at its location – to Tilman’s Roadhouse, a Western-chic restaurant serving comfort food.

For those unsure about what to eat, Trinity Groves is a trendy enclave that houses an eclectic mix of restaurants serving vegetarian, Middle Eastern fare, Chinese, barbecue, steak, or sushi. For overhead views of the city, the Reunion Tower takes you up over 500 feet and displays a layout of the city with its Halo interactive system.


The Alamo is San Antonio’s iconic landmark.

Daytime – San Antonio

San Antonio has many daytime sightseeing options showcasing its history, day-to-day living, and culture. The Alamo may be well recognized for its popular tagline but this monument also offers visitors a history lesson through a tour of its battlefield and walks through its Alamo Church and Long Barrack Museum. Also spend time at the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park to learn more about Spanish frontier missions.

The San Antonio River Walk connects to sights including the San Antonio Museum of Art and Blue Star Contemporary, a nonprofit contemporary arts organization. It also now contains a new eight-mile expansion known as the Mission Reach, which directly links to the Spanish missions

San Antonio’s downtown area’s Main Plaza has the historic San Fernando Cathedral and hosts both seasonal and ongoing events like a Christmas tree lighting and a farmers’ market.

If nature is of interest to you, see the San Antonio Botanical Garden, with a beautiful range of plant wonders, or the Natural Bridge Caverns, a set of underground chambers that can be explored via lighted and paved routes. Or go for a slower pace at public parks like the new Phil Hardberger Park, a former dairy farm turned green space, or the kid-friendly Hemisfair with its noted Yanaguana Garden.

Museum aficionados can linger in the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, which puts on a consistent calendar of exhibitions and public events, or the Witte Museum, which bridges science, nature, and culture in one location.

For breakfast or lunch, go to The Guenther House, an art nouveau Southtown café at Pioneer Flour Mills that whips up pastries and various daily specials.



The San Antonio River Walk has places to head out to for a great dinner.

Nighttime – San Antonio

San Antonio’s evening scene is all about nightclubs and dance halls. Do some toe stomping, or get some lessons in footwork, at Cowboys Dancehall. Unwind while hearing live music and enjoying refined Texas cuisine at Jazz, TX, or listen to some serious dueling piano action at Howl at the Moon. Sip on cocktails among rooftop views at Paramour or head to Zinc Bistro & Bar, a downtown favorite as a European wine pair with a Texas twist. Or hear some mariachi at The Mariachi Bar at Mi Terra Café.

The River Walk can also make for a nice nighttime option. Entertainment at The Majestic & Empire Theatres can feature musical acts and cultural performances. Best pick restaurants include Moses Rose’s Hideout, a watering hole with live music and a menu of burgers, tacos and barbecue; Waxy O’Connor’s, an authentic Irish pub; and Boudro’s, a New American bistro noted for its tableside made guacamole and grilled lunch and dinner offerings.

As for craft beer, find good choices. Freetail Brewing Co. produces staple suds such as their La Muerta made for the holiday, Dia de los Muertos. Ranger Creek Brewing & Distilling, an industrial “brewstillery” puts out a range of craft whiskeys and microbrews. Blue Star serves Southwestern fare in the happening Southtown neighborhood while Southerleigh Fine Food and Brewery operates within the city’s historic Pearl brewhouse.

Start your trip planning with these recommended hotels in Dallas and San Antonio.

This post is part of’s Underdog City campaign.

Boston and Philadelphia: A Tale of Two Historic Cities


Boston Public Garden. Photo: Massachusetts Office of Tourism

What’s Your Pick: Boston or Philadelphia?

Independence Mall

Independence Hall by D. Cruz for VISIT PHILADELPHIA


While the distance between of Boston and Philadelphia are located about a three-hour drive or six-hour Amtrak trek apart, these major cities have one big thing in common. They’re sources of history. And the modern day scene in these respective cities is thriving too. Here’s what to see in each state.


Boston Common in the fall. Photo credit: Tim Grafft/MOTT

History Is Happening!

Boston has many trails and locations connecting you to key figures linked to Beantown or in particular the start of the American Revolution.

Walk along the Freedom Trail, a self-guided, 2.5-route that will bring you past 16 historic sites. Pass by Boston Common, also known as America’s oldest park; The Paul Revere House – where the famous nightrider lived during the time of his legendary ride, to its end point, The Bunker Hill Monument, honoring soldiers in one of the earliest battles in the American Revolutionary War. The African American Trail will bring to you stops such as the Robert Gould Shaw and the 54 th Regiment Memorial, which commemorates the regiment that was made famous in the film, “Glory.”

Independence Hall

Independence Hall. Photo by J. Fusco for VISIT PHILADELPHIA

In comparison, Philadelphia clearly has a stronghold on U.S. history – for starters, the Liberty Bell at the Liberty Bell Center. In April 2017, the Museum of the American Revolution opened its doors, to tell the story of why our nation went to being a British colony to a new country in a different light. It goes beyond the usual key players by highlighting other figures such as freed and enslaved blacks, native peoples, and women. Then there’s Independence Hall, where our Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence and later on delegates would work on our Constitution. Also, did you know that the first “White House” – as in one before the famous home in D.C. – was in Philadelphia. Called The President’s House, this venue is now an open-air museum where the first Executive Mansion in which Presidents Washington and John Adams stayed.


Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Being Artsy and Scientific

The arts and sciences have their place in Boston and Philly. In Boston, you can spend a whole day at the Museum of Fine Arts. Its three levels house everything from Egyptian artifacts to Contemporary American art, with pieces from every corner of the globe. A short walk away, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum reflects the look of a Venetian palace with a beautiful courtyard along with a collection owned by its namesake, a major collector and philanthropist. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum honors the legacy of our country’s 35th Commander in Chief. The Mary Baker Eddy Library contains the Mapparium, a three-story, stained glass globe that can be walked through, and the Museum of Science will teach you a thing or two with planetarium shows and live exhibits and experiences like its butterfly garden.

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Philadelphia Museum of Art / Photo by B. Krist for Visit Philadelphia

Philly can boast having the oldest museum in the country – the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. It’s got some other fine ones too. Climbing up “The Rocky Steps” to the east entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art feels like a workout, but you’ll encounter the statue of Philly icon, Rocky Balboa. Inside the museum, discover artistic and architectural finds from all over the world, with an over 240,000-piece collection!

The Rodin Museum has the most pieces by this sculptor outside of Paris and Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens is a fun folk art/gallery space that’s covered in mosaics. If seeking science, The Franklin Institute is an educationally entertaining museum and research center with an IMAX theater and planetarium, while the Mütter Museum focuses on medical abnormalities with displays that might make you a bit squeamish.


Boston Public Market. Photo by Massachusetts Office of Tourism

Good Eats

Getting hungry? Both Boston and Philly can fill you up at markets or in eateries. An indoor enclave, Boston Public Market sells New England sourced bounty from farmers, fishers, and food product vendors, or features demos and classes at The Kitchen, the market’s programming center. Inside this historic meeting hall, Faneuil Hall Marketplace is now more a mall setup with food stands and restaurants offering staples like pizza, ice cream and chowda. On Fridays and Saturdays, the outdoor Haymarket at Congress and Hanover streets sells fruits and veggies. Boston’s North End is its Little Italy, with pizzerias, cafes and ristorantes such as Giacomo’s Restaurant. As for other restaurants, a hot seafood spot is Neptune Oyster, being well-noted for its raw bar and lobster rolls, or Atlantic Fish Company, a Boston surf and turf institution.

Reading Terminal Market

Reading Terminal Market. Photo by R. Kennedy for VISIT PHILADELPHIA

As one of Philly’s major culinary attractions, the Reading Terminal Market is an interior food hall with a cornucopia of Amish specialties, seafood and produce stands, cookware stores, and bakeries and restaurants. Of course, you have to try a Philly cheesesteak, but note there are more places to choose from than the noted rivalry between Pat’s King of Steaks and Geno’s Steaks. McNally’s puts theirs on a Kaiser roll, and Jimmy Fallon was seen digging Dalessandro’s Steaks. Have a hoagie at shops ranging from a tofu type at Fu Wah to the hearty stuffed at Cosmi’s Deli. Explore Chinatown and perhaps go for a late night meal at David’s Mai Lai Wah for their noodles and dumplings.

Get started on planning your visit by looking at these recommended hotels in Boston or Philly.  Tell me which historic city would you head to first.

This post is part of’s Underdog City campaign.